My Garden Right Now In Pictures

My garden, like many, is a busy place at the moment. I’m planting out bedding and tender crops, sowing seeds, keeping the pollinators happy and raising many plants for the school fete and local community garden open day. Today the kids have been sowing radish, carrot, beetroot and planting out marigolds and nasturtiums in their vegetable beds. They’ve also been finding wild flowers and painting our dried pumpkin seeds from last hallowe’en ready to make necklaces in celebration of 30 Days Wild challenge.

So here’s a selection of photos to give a glimpse of #mygardenrightnow – the beautiful bits and the working areas. I’ve been enjoying seeing everyone’s photos this weekend – it’s such a lovely time of year…

Side Garden

 

Thriving Quince tree (Meeches Prolific) and Potentilla x tonguei groundcover

DSC_0069.JPG

Lavender just coming into bloom

DSC_0071.JPG

Soon the Echinops, Perovskis and Verbascum will create a riot of blue and yellow

Binstore Green Roof

Dianthus deltoides, thrift, sedum and thymes – intricate flowers at eye level

Front Garden

 

DSC_0068

At this time of year, the evergreen structure of the garden is subsumed by clouds of summer flowers – here are Geranium ‘Anne Thompson’, Fuchsia ‘Army Nurse’, Lavandula ‘Twickel Purple’ and Rosa ‘Jacqueline du Pre’ 

Rosa ‘Jacqueline du Pre’ posing for her close-up

IMG_20170604_142237

Ox-eye Daisy, Snow-in-Summer, Lychnis coronaria, Campanula and Geranium

Working Areas

DSC_0057.JPG

Bedding plants waiting to be allocated to pots

DSC_0066.JPG

Plants in waiting – ready to go in the garden and stock plants

DSC_0054

This beautiful Sambucus nigra ‘Eva’ is waiting to go in the front garden, but in the meantime, it’s ripe for making pink elderflower cordial…

DSC_0067

Some of the plants off to be sold next weekend

Fruit, Vegetables and Herbs

DSC_0058

Veggie beds in progress…

DSC_0063.JPG

Some of my dahlias newly planted out

DSC_0062.JPG

The fruit cage – nearly ready for raspberry, currant and blueberry harvests

DSC_0061

Fruit trees and cornus grove – alas most of the fruitlets were taken by the frost this year

DSC_0075.JPG

Apple espaliers and the herb beds

DSC_0074.JPG

My collection of mints, lime balm and lemon verbena for teas

DSC_0065

The most hard-working spot – cucurbits, chillies and tomatoes mainly

Perennial vegetable corner – with perennial onion, spring onion, earth chestnut and hardy ginger

Flowerbed

DSC_0060.JPG

This bed has been left to go a bit wild this year – self-seeded Nigella damescena and Centranthus ruber ‘Albus’ have taken advantage of my lack of attention!

DSC_0044

Knautia macedonica and Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ make a great combination

DSC_0045

Clematis ‘Niobe’ is scrambling around at the edge of the bed

Some flowerbed stars

Lots of pots

DSC_0043

Love my hostas and Acer palmatum ‘Crimson Queen’

DSC_0050

Geranium x oxonianum ‘Walgrave Pink’ peeping out from the hosta pot!

Argyranthemum ‘Grandaisy Pink Halo’ and Artemisia schmedtiana ‘Nana’ just starting to come together

DSC_0073

Viola and dahlia by the front door – this area needs work this week…

So that’s My Garden Right Now – a place of laughter and play, with some plants rioting whilst others behave themselves – at least for the moment. We attract pollinators and far too many slugs and snails, we work hard and then drink tea, wine, cordial, eat cupcakes in the sunshine. We come together as a family and celebrate the magic of nature, as seeds germinate, plants grow, then flower, produce fruit or attempt to colonise their neighbours’ space. What a blessing is a garden! 🙂

If you’d like to get involved in #mygardenrightnow, you can use the hashtag for your pictures, videos and stories.

I’d love you to follow my blog for more stories about my garden and allotment, recipes and lots more gardening related topics. Happy Gardening…

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

Gardening For A Sustainable Future

Wild, evocative show gardens like James Basson’s M&G Garden, inspired by the landscape of Malta, new plants to discover (my favourite this year is Raymond Evison’s Clematis ‘Pistachio’) and new technologies like the use of microalgae to capture energy at Capel Manor’s ‘Compost, Energy, Light’ Garden: these are all part of what makes RHS Chelsea such a captivating and vibrant show. But after six hours exploring the showground, learning about new plants and discovering new ways to combine old favourites, I had still to find a garden that evoked feelings strong enough to draw me into its story and planting, creating what Coleridge described as the ‘suspension of disbelief’ – in which the show garden recedes and you find yourself immersed in a landscape where nothing external exists. Then I found myself in Nigel Dunnett’s RHS Greening Grey Britain Garden and the showground faded away. Wandering through the garden, past the black elder (Sambucus nigra ‘Gerda’), surrounded by the loose planting of Camassia quamash, Euphorbia palustris, Dianthus carthusianorum, Libertia chilensis Formosa Group and Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ in deep purples and vibrant lime greens, with soft water over pebbles and looking up to green walls and roofs, I was in a garden that created a sense of peace: an instinctive oneness with both the planting and the environment.

IMG_20170525_202211.JPG

Nigel’s vibrant planting remains soft and delicate throughout

Up on the balcony overlooking the lower garden, Nigel explained that the main garden is designed as a community space where residents of high-rise and apartment developments could come together to relax, socialise and enjoy the planting based on drought tolerant, low maintenance species like Euphorbia cyparissias ‘Fen’s Ruby’ and Stachys byzantina that will thrive in our warming climate. The water channels running beside the walkways and benches create a sense of tranquility for residents and also provide hollows and wetland areas to deal with runoff from flash floods, whilst the pebbles enable water levels to remain higher even in dry periods. Like Nigel’s 2015 Greening Grey Britain Garden at RHS Hampton Court, this garden includes recycled materials, green walls and green roofs. I was pleased to see the binstore green roof, having designed a similar roof on my binstore after being inspired by the idea at Hampton Court in 2015. Next to the binstore, tall, multi-tiered ‘Creature Towers’ designed with recycled materials mirror the high-rise apartments, offering urban homes for the insects which form such an important part of the natural ecosystem.

DSC_0172.JPG

High-rise insect homes

On the balcony, intended as a private garden, Nigel demonstrates how even tiny outdoor spaces can provide colour and edible crops. The small wooden planters are full of tomatoes, artichokes, herbs and a wisteria which trails along the balcony, whilst the walls provide a vertical growing space with a simple pocket design attached to a mesh on the wall. These pockets can be used for planting or simply to place plants still in their pots and the wall is small enough to be watered by hand, making this a practical and sustainable way to maximise space, especially as many of the plants (like the Mediterranean herbs thyme and oregano) require little water. Looking down from the balcony the private garden is set in context – a small space to provide privacy, flowers and food: a personalised area within a larger landscape of community planting.

IMG_20170525_201901.JPG

Edible green wall

As a community garden volunteer, I believe that working with plants is a healing and nurturing activity. Gardening also helps us to appreciate the fundamental role that plants play in our lives: a role that will become even more important in the future. As climatic challenges arise we will need to develop our understanding of horticulture, crop production and environmental protection to keep up with the changing climate, so engaging young minds with the beauty and importance of nature is a priority. With this in mind, the fact that the plants and other elements will be relocated to a school garden via the BBC One Show’s competition after Chelsea ends exemplifies the ethos of the garden and adds to its environmental credentials. The only addition I would like to have seen was more detail on the information leaflet about the plants chosen for their drought-resistant or pollution-soaking qualities, for example links to the informative RHS website pages, such as the section covering plants which tolerate dry conditions.

During my recent sessions running a growing club at my local primary school, I have seen firsthand the impact that becoming involved in gardening has on children. They are so open and keen to learn about the magic of nature, so receptive to the ‘wow’ moments when a seed germinates or when they learn to identify a plant. After half term I’m planning a session about careers in horticulture and botany – looking at what it takes to become a greenkeeper, a NASA plant scientist, a horticultural therapist or a park ranger. Maybe one of my pupils or a student from the school which receives the RHS Garden will become a future soil scientist or a biodiversity officer. Let’s hope so because we need experts in these fields like never before. The RHS Greening Grey Britain Garden has engaged the horticultural community in discussions about sustainable gardening, offered environmentally-friendly options for both domestic gardeners and landscape architects and I’m sure it will go on to inspire the next generation when it becomes part of a school garden. The creation of a show garden with this level of aesthetic and environmental integrity is an impressive achievement, especially when it provides such a practical model for the development of urban spaces in the future. 

A garden full of practical ideas, yet suffused with beauty

Further information about the Greening Grey Britain campaign and to sign up to turn a grey area green, follow the link to the RHS website.

If you’d like to follow my blog for more articles on RHS Shows and sustainable gardening, alongside many other topics, please subscribe below. Thanks and happy gardening 🙂

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Rising Stars At The RHS Chelsea Flower Show

It was a busy day at the 40 Sunbury Road Garden in the Great Pavilion as the Westland Rising Stars of the Garden Centre Industry brought their quirky container gardens to take pride of place on the stand. The garden has been created by the Horticultural Trade Association (HTA) and the Association of Professional Landscapers (APL) in conjunction with Peter Seabrook and The Sun to celebrate Peter’s forty years working at the newspaper as its gardening correspondent. A refreshing garden, 40 Sunbury Road depicts a fairly typical back garden (16m x 5m) complete with lawn, sandpit and rotary washing line – not unlike my own garden. The lawn is surrounded by interesting, varied planting such as a living WonderWall with strawberries (Marshalls Fragraria x ananassa ‘Marshmello’), begonias and a selection of different thymes.

DSC_0069.JPG

Shed with green wall, insect houses and green roof above

As well as introducing five new plants entered for the RHS Chelsea Plant of the Year Award (won by Suttons for Mulberry Charlotte Russe ‘Matsunaga’ which I have been enjoying growing at home this year), the garden is playing host to the Westland Horticulture’s Rising Stars Containers, designed and planted by three of this year’s Rising Stars (a programme, now in its ninth year, which offers young garden centre stars of the future coaching sessions to help them get ahead in the world of horticultural retail.) All three Rising Stars based their designs around the theme ‘unusual containers’ drawing on personal experiences and offering ideas that can be adapted and used in ordinary gardens.

DSC_0047.JPG

Sarah’s kettle barbecue container

Sarah Stewart from Klondyke Garden Centre in Polmont, Scotland, used a kettle barbecue as her container, filling it with a selection of alpines, ferns and grasses, along with a miniature red telephone box, post box and Union Jack bunting. She told me that her container celebrates her family’s tradition of having barbecues whenever possible. Living in Scotland, they brave the weather and take every opportunity to get together outside, come rain or shine.

DSC_0048.JPG

Emma filled a pink toy car with her bright bedding plants

Emma Blackmore from Bents Garden Centre in Preston created a container garden in a pink toy car from the children’s ‘Boutique at Bents’ range. She planted it with cheerful pink and purple bedding and strawberries inspired by her two year old daughter’s love of the garden. Emma works in the bedding department at Bents and enjoys the creativity involved in designing container and hanging basket planting. Emma’s container won her the David Colgrave Foundation Award and she was presented with a certificate and £250 towards further training.

DSC_0049 (2)

Kathryn with her container and picture of Harley

Kathryn Hunt from Stewarts Garden Centre in Christchurch, Dorset turned to woodland planting for her container which was created in homage to her five year old black Labrador Harley who died last year. She chose plants which grow in Black Park where Harvey used to enjoy going for walks. The container is a rustic barrel and the display is top-dressed with bark to add to the woodland look. This container would suit a shady area of the garden or patio and would fit well in a cottage or informal garden.

Keith Nicholson, Marketing Director for Westland Horticulture, sponsors of the Rising Stars Programme said “This is a fantastic opportunity for the Rising Stars and their garden centres to exhibit at the prestigious RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Not only will they have the opportunity to experience another element of the horticultural industry, but they will also be part of the most important horticultural event in the world!”

So much interest in such a small space

40 Sunbury Road reaches out to the public, offering ideas of ornamental and edible planting for real gardens, whilst also encouraging the next generation of horticultural experts to develop their skills. As I left the garden I overheard a couple discussing the garden and the barbecue container, remarking that they had an unused barbecue at home which they could repurpose using Sarah’s container garden as a guide. This conversation demonstrates that 40 Sunbury Road fulfils its purpose as both a beautiful artistic creation and an inspiration space with practical ideas which anyone can take home and try in their own back garden.

The three container gardens on view as a centrepiece of the garden

 

 

 

What’s In A Name? Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst In Snow’

Centaurea montana is a useful plant for the late spring/early summer border. It has pollinator-friendly, delicate flowers with feather-like petals and was traditionally used to make a bitter tea to treat dyspepsia and as a diuretic. Originating in sub-alpine woods and meadows, the perennial cornflower has been naturalised in the UK since as early as 1597 when the herbalist John Gerard records growing it in his garden. The name ‘Centaurea‘ originates from the Greek ‘Kentauros‘ as the plant’s medicinal properties were first discovered, according to Pliny, by the mythical character Chiron the Centaur. 

DSC_0007_1.JPG

Centaurea montana

Centaurea as a genus encompasses between 350 and 600 species of thistle-like plants in the family Asteraceaea. Centaurea montana is also known as ‘perennial cornflower’, ‘great blue-bottle’, ‘mountain cornflower’, ‘batchelor’s button’, ‘mountain bluet’ or ‘mountain knapweed’, with ‘montana’  referring to the sub-alpine regions in which the plant originates. 

DSC_0492 (2).JPG

Centaurea montana ‘Jordy’ and ‘Amethyst in Snow’ from the garden

Centaurea montana does have a tendency to be an enthusiastic garden plant – it needs to be controlled by removing unwanted sections as it spreads out, but the named varieties are much better behaved in my experience. Although I love the colour of ‘Jordy’ with its deep plum purple flowers, I find they can get lost in a border when viewing it from any distance away. They work well as a cut flower and, as with all Centaurea montana, if picked regularly the plant will continue to produce flowers for a long period. My favourite variety is ‘Amethyst in Snow’ for its ability to create delicate highlights in a border, its contrasting amethyst eye, set in the snowy white petals and the silver-green foliage. ‘Amethyst in Snow’ was discovered in 2002 by Dutch seedsman Kees Sahin and it tolerates a little shade more happily than other varieties. It is supposedly the first bicolor knapweed and is similar (possibly identical) to another variety called ‘Purple Heart’.

DSC_0004_1

‘Amethyst in Snow’ shining out in a sea of forget-me-nots in my garden border

For a fully white flower there’s Centaurea montana ‘Alba’ and ‘Gold Bullion’ has blue flowers against chartreuse yellow foliage. ‘Carnea’ has soft pink flowers and ‘Violetta’ deeper violet purple flowers. This varied colour range means Centaurea montana has the ability to be combined with soft pastel planting or included in vibrant schemes with deep reds, oranges, blues and purples. A versatile garden plant, Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst in Snow’ combines elegance with a stout heart.

 

Bulbs To Light Up Spring

We’ve had a spectacular spring for bulbs, both inside and out, largely thanks to J. Parker’s who have kindly supplied us with a fabulous selection to trial this year. Bulb anticipation began in January when we planted the Hippeastrum with awed respect for the size of the bulbs. By late February, paperwhite daffodils were filling every corner of the house with their captivating scent, adding a sparkle to our late winter days.

‘Premier’ starting to unfurl and paperwhite daffodils

Then the Hippeastrum flowerbuds burst apart and since that moment the house has been a riot of colour. ‘Premier’, ‘Hercules’ and ‘Charisma’ all lived up to their auspicious names and graced the kitchen table with their majestic flowers throughout March and April. ‘Premier’ reached 80cm tall and all three Hippeastrum had two rounds of flowering. The children were fascinated by the way such mammoth flowers could be contained within the modest buds, escaping and inflating to such monumental proportions. Our favourite was ‘Premier’ for the depth of colour, but all three had power and charm – it was rather like having a pet on the kitchen table for a few weeks.

 

‘Charisma’, ‘Premier’, ‘Hercules’ and a small person who loved her gigantic floral friend

17266190_1777595602569136_8933343010003877888_n

The first bunch of ‘Gigantic Star’

As the Hippeastrum were fading, the allotment cutting patch stepped up to the mark. I wrote last year about beginning a cutting patch by planting rows of spring bulbs and the hours of soggy digging were worth the effort. First out was Narcissus ‘Gigantic Star’ with its yolk-yellow trumpets and another delicious scent. It took over from the paperwhites and carried the show alone until the tulips began. Its flowers are long-lasting in a vase and once their golden glow is cast over a room, you know spring is here to stay.

 

‘Slawa’ is perhaps my favourite of the tulips with its deep purple and red markings standing out against the double flowered Narcissus ‘The Bride’ and delicate Narcissus  ‘Thalia’.

DSC_0085

‘The Bride’, ‘Thalia’ and ‘Slawa’ at their best

Then came Narcissus ‘Piper’s End’ – another new one for me – its dark centres ringed with green, a softly fringed corona and offset white perianth segments. 

Mesmerising centres of ‘Piper’s End’ and ‘Shirley’

Tulipa ‘Carnival de Rio’ and ‘Hollandia’ create a vibrant display together as does Tulipa ‘Attila’ with one of my old favourites ‘Shirley’. Tulipa ‘Jimmy’ is a soft orange with red-tinged centres to the petals and it softens the deep crimson glow of ‘Ronaldo’ in an arrangement.

DSC_0062

‘Slawa’, ‘Carnival de Rio’ and Narcissus ‘The Bride’

Planting complementary colours in the allotment has allowed me to arrange the flowers singly or in mixed bunches and the ploy of moving the cutting patch to the allotment has been a success. Now that my flower crop is no longer visible from the kitchen window, I have only the merest reluctance about wielding the scissors.

The cutting patch ready for picking

Anyone helping with my allotment this spring has returned home with bunches of flowers in makeshift vases – old milk bottles which double up as cane toppers – and the kitchen and study haven’t been with cut flowers since February. 

DSC_0145

Narcissus ‘Piper’s End’ and Tulipa ‘Attila’, ‘Shirley’, Hollandia’ and ‘Carnival de Rio’

Right at the end of the show, the vidiflora tulips ‘Spring Green’, ‘Artist’ and ‘Groenland’ and the beautiful triumph tulip ‘Mistress Grey’ have joined the party, adding a smoky, subtle touch to my spring arrangements.

IMG_20170506_182832[1]

‘Mistress Grey’

I’d definitely recommend daffodils and tulips as good cutting material and I’m hoping many of the tulips (all planted on a gravel base) will be perennial and crop for several years. I’ve been buying bulbs from J. Parker’s for years as they have a good range with new varieties each year to try out. All the bulbs we received were healthy and all flowered well for us. Now I’m off to the allotment to plant out my gladioli and collect the next tulip assortment. And come autumn I’ll be scouring the catalogues for a few exciting new varieties to add sparkle to my arrangements in 2018.

IMG_20170503_134309

Nothing better than a cup of assam and fresh flowers to create a relaxing atmosphere (‘Shirley’, ‘Attila’, ‘Groenland’ and ‘Spring Green’)

What flowers perform well for cutting in other allotments and gardens? I’d love to hear about bulbs which I could add to my list for cutting and combinations which look attractive in a vase. Happy gardening 🙂

If you’d like to follow the cutting patch throughout the year, you can subscribe below:

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

More information about the cutting patch and our favourite tulips can be found in the following posts:

Banish the September blues with my top 10 tulips

Planning a Cutting Patch: Bulb Time

Planning a Cutting Patch: Annual Choices